James Friedman | 12 Nazi Concentration Camps

James Friedman’s work “12 Nazi Concentration Camps” is about awareness, distance and expectations. Not only is he aware of the historical facts of the Nazi era, he is also reflecting how those who have not experienced the Holocaust first hand might have encountered the topic in school, of what their parents, the press and the old black and white pictures told them. He is also awake to his role as a photographer who is unable to capture all the inexpressible torture and pain and that he can’t tell the whole truth of the catastrophe. With his own appearance in his pictures as a shadow, a hand or in persona in the background with his camera around his neck, the viewer is reflecting James Friedman’s role as a photographer and his own role as a viewer and judge. This multilayered and reflected state of mind needs some distance from the emotional topic but surprisingly the pictures are warm and witty, humorous even. Continue Reading →